Cincinnati Landscaping

Landscape Tips in Cincinnati

We're here to help you care for your landscape!
To help you maintain the beauty and health of your new landscaping, Landscaping by Don Gilb recommends that you follow these simple maintenance steps:


Proper Watering:  Watering is the most important element to protect your new landscape investment.  As your plants mature they may not require watering on a regular basis, but additional watering during the hot, dry summer months, July and August, will maintain healthy plants year round.  Also, it’s a good idea to have your plants well watered late in the fall each year to help your plants survive the winter.  At times, rainfall can be adequate for watering, but often the rain isn’t enough to water the root system. Always check around the base of the plant for the moisture content of soil before watering.

First Year Watering of New Landscapes:
First Two Weeks:  Water every other day
Spring & Summer: Water twice a week
Fall:  Water once a week until there is a hard frost
Shrubs:  Water around the base of each plant for 20-30 seconds
Trees:  Water around the base of each plant for 3-5 minutes
Perennials & Groundcovers:  Water around the base of each plant for 10 seconds
Annual Flowers:  Consistently keep root zone moist, may require daily watering
Check the soil’s moisture content if you’re not sure if it’s time to water.  If the soil around the plant is dry, then go ahead and water.

Perennials & Groundcovers: 
Water around the base of each plant for 10 seconds
Be sure to water your new plants with a garden hose, not a lawn sprinkler. Lawn sprinklers tend to only water the top layer of the soil which doesn’t penetrate to the root zone of the plants.  Try to water early in the morning (ideal time) or later in the evening hours.  It is important to not water the entire plant, only the root zone.  Watering the foliage can lead to fungal diseases.

Fertilization of Ornamental Trees & Shrubs: Good nutrition is important for every living thing and plants are no exception.  While it’s true that plants make their own food, they need a base of nutrients in order to manufacture food (through photosynthesis).  Not fertilizing your plants won't kill them, but they won't be as healthy as they would be with proper fertilization.
Most labels list contents based on quantities of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. For example, a 10-5-10 fertilizer would be 10 percent nitrogen, 5 percent phosphorous and 10 percent potassium.  If you are trying to achieve high foliage growth, you should look for a fertilizer with higher nitrogen content.  You'll get a faster growing, larger plant. But, if you want better "fruit" growth - flowers and vegetables - look for higher phosphorous and potassium contents.
When adding fertilizer during the rest of the growing season, give the flowering plants a little extra phosphorous and potassium, again look for a 5-10-10 ratio and pay attention to the suggested rates of application and timing.

Plants That May Require Acidic Fertilizers (Depending on Your Soil Conditions):
Azaleas
Hollies
Rhododendrons
Hydrangeas (To alter bloom colors)
Japanese Pieris
Mountain Laurel
Fothergilla
Magnolias
Dogwoods
And Most Evergreens

When adding fertilizer, give the flowering plants a little extra phosphorous and potassium, again look for a 5-10-10 ratio and pay attention to the suggested rates of application and timing.